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Poll Results: “What Will Google Domains Market Share Of The Registrar Market Be A Year After Launch?”

July 20th, 2014 Comments off

google

The results from our latest poll question are out and most don’t think Go Daddy should be crawling under their desk as one IPO analyst remarked. Google getting into the registrar space caused quite a stir a few weeks back. We had 240 voters and 19% do not see Google in the top 20. 13% see Google in position number 10 and 12 % see them in position number 20.

What Will Google Domains Market Share Of The Registrar Market Be A Year After Launch?

  • Not in Top 20 (19%, 45 Votes)
  • 10 (13%, 32 Votes)
  • 20 (12%, 28 Votes)
  • 1 (9%, 21 Votes)
  • 2 (8%, 18 Votes)
  • 5 (7%, 17 Votes)
  • 3 (6%, 15 Votes)
  • 15 (5%, 11 Votes)
  • 4 (4%, 10 Votes)
  • 8 (3%, 6 Votes)
  • 18 (2%, 5 Votes)
  • 11 (2%, 5 Votes)
  • 7 (2%, 5 Votes)
  • 17 (2%, 4 Votes)
  • 12 (1%, 3 Votes)
  • 9 (1%, 3 Votes)
  • 16 (1%, 3 Votes)
  • 6 (1%, 3 Votes)
  • 13 (1%, 3 Votes)
  • 19 (1%, 2 Votes)
  • 14 (0%, 1 Votes)

The new poll question is who is the greatest domain investor of all time ? We did a post a couple weeks ago where some left comments, a few people told me they did not want to leave a comment and would rather anonymously vote.

Categories: External Articles, google, poll Tags:

Google Reports Earnings Stock Up in After Hours Trading

July 17th, 2014 Comments off

google

Google is out with their earnings for Q2 2014

Google Inc. reported consolidated revenues of $15.96 billion for the quarter ended June 30, 2014, an increase of 22% compared to the second quarter of 2013. Google Inc. reports advertising revenues, consistent with GAAP, on a gross basis without deducting traffic acquisition costs (TAC). In the second quarter of 2014, TAC totaled $3.29 billion, or 23% of advertising revenues.

The stock is currently up $6 or 1% in after hours trading.

 

Q2 Financial Highlights

Revenues and other information - Google Inc. revenues for the quarter ended June 30, 2014 were $15.96 billion, representing a 22% increase over second quarter of 2013 revenues of $13.11 billion.

  • Sites Revenues – Our sites generated revenues of $10.94 billion, or 69% of total revenues, in the second quarter of 2014. This represents a 23% increase over second quarter of 2013 sites revenues of $8.87 billion.
  • Network Revenues – Our partner sites generated revenues of $3.42 billion, or 21% of total revenues, in the second quarter of 2014. This represents a 7% increase over second quarter of 2013 network revenues of $3.19 billion.
  • Other Revenues – Other revenues were $1.60 billion, or 10% of total revenues, in the second quarter of 2014. This represents a 53% increase over second quarter of 2013 other revenues of $1.05 billion.
  • International Revenues – Our revenues from outside of the United States totaled $9.33 billion, representing 58% of total revenues in the second quarter of 2014, compared to 57% in the first quarter of 2014 and 55% in the second quarter of 2013.
    • Our revenues from the United Kingdom totaled $1.62 billion, representing 10% of total revenues in the second quarter of 2014, compared to 10% in the second quarter of 2013.
  • Foreign Exchange Impact on Revenues – Excluding gains related to our foreign exchange risk management program, had foreign exchange rates remained constant from the first quarter of 2014 through the second quarter of 2014, our revenues in the second quarter of 2014 would have been $77 million lower. Excluding gains related to our foreign exchange risk management program, had foreign exchange rates remained constant from the second quarter of 2013 through the second quarter of 2014, our revenues in the second quarter of 2014 would have been $120 million lower.
    • In the second quarter of 2014, we recognized a benefit of $6 million to revenues through our foreign exchange risk management program, compared to $35 million in the second quarter of 2013.

    Reconciliations of our non-GAAP international revenues excluding the impact of foreign exchange and hedging to GAAP international revenues are included at the end of this release.

  • Paid Clicks – Aggregate paid clicks, which include clicks related to ads served on Google sites and the sites of our Network members, increased approximately 25% over the second quarter of 2013 and increased approximately 2% over the first quarter of 2014. Sites paid clicks, which include clicks related to ads we serve on Google owned and operated properties across different geographies and form factors including search, YouTube engagement ads like TrueView, and other owned and operated properties like Maps and Finance, increased approximately 33% over the second quarter of 2013 and increased approximately 6% over the first quarter of 2014. Network paid clicks, which include clicks related to ads served on non-Google properties participating in our AdSense for Search, AdSense for Content, and AdMob businesses, increased approximately 9% over the second quarter of 2013 and decreased approximately 5% over the first quarter of 2014.
  • Cost-Per-Click – Average cost-per-click, which includes clicks related to ads served on Google sites and the sites of our Network members, decreased approximately 6% over the second quarter of 2013 and remained constant from the first quarter of 2014. Cost-per-click for Google sites decreased approximately 7% over the second quarter of 2013 and decreased approximately 2% over the first quarter of 2014. Network cost-per-click decreased approximately 13% over the second quarter of 2013 and increased approximately 3% over the first quarter of 2014.
  • TAC – Traffic acquisition costs, the portion of revenues shared with Google’s partners, increased to $3.29 billion in the second quarter of 2014, compared to $3.01 billion in the second quarter of 2013. TAC as a percentage of advertising revenues was 23% in the second quarter of 2014, compared to 25% in the second quarter of 2013.The majority of TAC is related to amounts ultimately paid to our Network members, which totaled $2.40 billion in the second quarter of 2014. TAC also includes amounts ultimately paid to certain distribution partners and others who direct traffic to our website, which totaled $893 million in the second quarter of 2014.

Other Cost of Revenues – Other cost of revenues, which is comprised primarily of data centers operational expenses, hardware inventory costs, amortization of acquisition-related intangible assets, and content acquisition costs, increased to $2.82 billion, or 18% of revenues, in the second quarter of 2014, compared to $2.18 billion, or 17% of revenues, in the second quarter of 2013.

Operating Expenses – Operating expenses, other than cost of revenues, were $5.58 billion in the second quarter of 2014, or 35% of revenues, compared to $4.45 billion in the second quarter of 2013, or 34% of revenues.

Categories: External Articles, google Tags:

New Stealthier Ads Are A Big Hit For Google

July 17th, 2014 Comments off

google

John Koetsier wrote a very interesting piece on Venture Beat on how the new look of Google ads is boosting click through rates. Back in March Computer World explained,

Google is testing some changes to the way it displays search results, including a tweak to how it presents paid links that could throw off unsuspecting users.

Paid links in Google’s search results are marked today with a yellow shaded background. Under the experimental layout, which is being widely tested with users, a small yellow button that says “Ad” appears in front of paid links instead.

Now the Venture Beat article took data from a study conducted by Adobe, that shows the change has worked and it should be good news for the company ahead of its quarterly earnings report due out today.

From the article:

The data is in, and Google’s new stealthier, blended-in, less-obviously-an-ad offerings have boosted clickthroughs tremendously: They’re up 20 percent just in the last quarter. That should be good news for Google when the company reports Q2 earnings tomorrow.

A massive Adobe ad study of over $2 billion in ad spend shows that not only are clickthroughs up, so are costs: CPCs rose slightly by four percent over the same period. In contrast, Yahoo/Bing search ad CPCs declined.

Why?

“Mobile and tablet are having an impact there,” Adobe director of product marketing Tim Waddell told me yesterday. “Not to mention the switchover to Google’s new ad types … going away from the different background colors.”

Google Ads used to be obvious, with a different background color than the rest of the page, which clearly highlighted them as commercial content. At the beginning of this year, however, Google changed its format, giving ads the same white background as the rest of the page and replacing it with a substantially smaller “Ad” notification.

Read the full article which contains some interesting charts comparing the results here.

Categories: External Articles, google Tags:

New Stealthier Ads Are A Big Hit For Google

July 17th, 2014 Comments off

google

John Koetsier wrote a very interesting piece on Venture Beat on how the new look of Google ads is boosting click through rates. Back in March Computer World explained,

Google is testing some changes to the way it displays search results, including a tweak to how it presents paid links that could throw off unsuspecting users.

Paid links in Google’s search results are marked today with a yellow shaded background. Under the experimental layout, which is being widely tested with users, a small yellow button that says “Ad” appears in front of paid links instead.

Now the Venture Beat article took data from a study conducted by Adobe, that shows the change has worked and it should be good news for the company ahead of its quarterly earnings report due out today.

From the article:

The data is in, and Google’s new stealthier, blended-in, less-obviously-an-ad offerings have boosted clickthroughs tremendously: They’re up 20 percent just in the last quarter. That should be good news for Google when the company reports Q2 earnings tomorrow.

A massive Adobe ad study of over $2 billion in ad spend shows that not only are clickthroughs up, so are costs: CPCs rose slightly by four percent over the same period. In contrast, Yahoo/Bing search ad CPCs declined.

Why?

“Mobile and tablet are having an impact there,” Adobe director of product marketing Tim Waddell told me yesterday. “Not to mention the switchover to Google’s new ad types … going away from the different background colors.”

Google Ads used to be obvious, with a different background color than the rest of the page, which clearly highlighted them as commercial content. At the beginning of this year, however, Google changed its format, giving ads the same white background as the rest of the page and replacing it with a substantially smaller “Ad” notification.

Read the full article which contains some interesting charts comparing the results here.

Categories: External Articles, google Tags:

Is SEO on the verge of extinction ?

July 15th, 2014 Comments off

Where is SEO Headed ?

Andrew Edwards wrote an article on Click Z asking the question, “Is SEO dead ?” Edwards seems to believe that Google taking away the keyword data makes SEO less valuable as a major support system has been taken away.

Edwards points out that it is in the best interest of Google to try to undermine SEO,

There is no good reason for Google to stop trying to stamp out SEO, because in effect, SEO damps the quality of search results for the user. Google is interested in the user – and, as you might have guessed already, it reduces the value of a paid AdWords link. Because Google AdWords is a form of SEO, which really is SEM (search engine marketing); in other words, you optimize your site’s Google performance by bidding on Google keywords whereby Google makes pretty much all of its money.

Edwards also points out the SEO industry is a large one at that,

SEO is a big industry. According to a site called State of Digital, 863 million websites mention SEO globally and every second 105 people search for SEO links on Google. Most of them seem to be looking for “services” or “companies,” which explains how there came to be so many SEO companies.

Edwards pointed out that the core principles of SEO make sense for all webmasters,

Certain SEO principles should not be ignored, simply as a matter of site-hygiene. A well-organized, content-rich site is a good thing to have. But most other SEO tricks and tips have just a little bit (if not a lot) of snake-oil in the recipe. It sounds like a great proposition to a site owner: drink a bottle of SEO and your site will zoom vigorously to the top of the heap. But too often, and partly because Google does not seem to want it to, it doesn’t work as advertised.

Read the full article here

There are about 15 comments on the article which do not necessarily agree with Andrew, they believe he painted all SEO professionals with one brush. There will always be a healthy debate around the topic.

Categories: External Articles, google, Search/SEO Tags:

Google Wants Your Opinion On How They Should Implement “Right To Be Forgotten”

July 11th, 2014 Comments off

Google’s Advisory Council is asking the public on how they should implement the EU court required “Right to be Forgotten”

The question Google is asking is:

“How should one person’s right to be forgotten be balanced with the public’s right to know?”

“”A recent ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union found that European law gives people the right to ask search engines like Google to remove results for queries that include their name.

Since then, we’ve received removal requests on all sorts of content: serious criminal records, embarrassing photos, instances of online bullying and name-calling, decades-old allegations, negative press stories, and more.

For each of these requests, we’re required to weigh, on a case-by-case basis, an individual’s right to be forgotten with the public’s right to know.

We want to strike this balance right. This obligation is a new and difficult challenge for us, and we’re seeking advice on the principles Google ought to apply when making decisions on individual cases. That’s why we’re convening a council of experts.

We’re just getting started, but during this process we also want to hear your input, too — this is all about your rights online, and the Internet provides an incredible forum for discussion and debate.””

If you want to share your opinion with Google on this very important issue please click here

 

Categories: External Articles, google, Legal Tags:

Yelp Joins The List of Companies Looking to Undo Google – European Union Antitrust Settlement

July 10th, 2014 Comments off

google

Yelp would like to see the antitrust settlement between Google and the European Union have a complete overhaul. Yelp has had many things to say about Google over the years and even rebuffed a buyout attempt a few years ago. Greg Sterling wrote a piece on Search Engine Land about Yelp joining others in wanting to see a harsher settlement for Google with the E.U.

From the article:

Yelp has been an increasingly vocal critic of Google for several years. Now it has joined a group of companies opposing the European Commission’s current antitrust settlement proposal with Google.

Originally Google and Yelp were partners. Google unsuccessfully tried to buy Yelp for a rumored $500 million a year or so before the company went public. Later Yelp complained that Google was including Yelp reviews in its own local product without permission.

According to Yelp, Google said it couldn’t remove those reviews without removing Yelp from the index entirely. The dispute was ultimately resolved with FTC intervention. Indeed, the ability to disallow Google to include content in potentially competitive “vertical” offerings while maintaining it in the general index became part of the FTC antitrust settlement with Google and is part of the current EU settlement proposal.

According to a report in the NY Times, Yelp filed a formal complaint in Europe last month:

Read the full article here

There was another Yelp/Google related story on Tech Crunch which dealt with leaked documents and how Yelp feels it is getting screwed by Google. Danny Sullivan took a look at the documents and feels that Yelp is not getting screwed how they think.

Yelp may once again feel Google is robbing it of its fair share of search traffic, with a study that’s been leaked to TechCrunch to prove it. A close read of that study actually shows that it proves the opposite — or at least, that it’s certainly not as damning as it sounds.

Leaked Documents Show How Yelp Thinks It’s Getting Screwed By Google is the story over at TechCrunch out today with the study. I’ve taken my own headline from that to do this contrarian view.

What Do People Seeking Yelp Content At Google Click On….

Yelp seems to have wanted to determine how much traffic Google might be “siphoning” away from Yelp by somehow promoting Google+ Local in Google’s own listings. Yelp either conducted its own user behavior study or more likely contracted to have one done.

The study is summarized in these slides that TechCrunch obtained and shared on Scribd. Core to it is the contention that if people are explicitly looking for Yelp content on Google, Google is snagging them away.

Read the full article here

 

Categories: External Articles, google Tags:

Xbiz.com Asks Google To Reverse Ban On Advertising For Adult Websites

July 9th, 2014 Comments off

header_logo

 

 

 

 

Alec Helmy President & Publisher of the adult industry publication xBiz.com sent a letter to Google yesterday asking the company to reconsider its “recent decision to no longer accept ads from adult oriented websites”

We reported a week ago that Google new policy on advertising for explicit adult terms went into effect which Google announced in early June.

Mr. Helmy writes:

“Not surprisingly, an organization founded on imposing its idea of morality on lawful material has taken credit for your decision.

You see, while the adult industry will always fight a certain stigma perpetuated by the extreme right, it’s never been more responsible in the way it creates and delivers entertainment. This is an industry that not only provides one of the most popular forms of online entertainment, but also one which complies with applicable laws and contributes millions in taxes.

If the government accepts adult industry money, so can/should you.

As the publisher of business news for the adult industry, I have the privilege of being at the hub of information pertaining to industry matters. And based on this, I can tell you that your decision has left countless businesses in dismay, bewildered about why an ultra progressive company that is so committed to ‘Freedom of Expression’ would make such a decision.

These same companies also remain concerned about what the future may hold specifically, whether you will also decide to place adult oriented websites at a decided disadvantage in organic search results.

On behalf of the adult industry, I ask that you reflect upon your founding philosophies and to not waiver from them.””

Categories: External Articles, google Tags:

Google’s Matt Cutt to take a break

July 4th, 2014 Comments off

google

Head of Google web spam Matt Cutts said that he is taking a break and going on leave. Matt certainly does take a lot of abuse defending the Panda and the Penguin and while I am sure he has made a lot of money at Google, it must be a stressful job. Maybe Sergey and Larry could make it easier on him by allowing Google to be a little more transparent and accountable for their actions.

Danny Sullivan wrote on Search Engine Land:

It will be the longest break Cutts has ever taken from Google since he started with the company back in 2000 and since he began overseeing the web spam team in 2004. It’s also one that he writes is overdue. From his post:

When I joined Google, my wife and I agreed that I would work for 4-5 years, and then she’d get to see more of me. I talked about this as recently as last month and as early as 2006. And now, almost fifteen years later I’d like to be there for my wife more. I know she’d like me to be around more too, and not just physically present while my mind is still on work.Cutts says he’ll be off work through October of this year. He notes he won’t be checking any work email. He also stressed that there’s no specific event behind him taking the time off, other than fulfilling this long-standing promise to his wife.

Tom Foremski wrote on Silicon Valley Watcher that he thinks this move may foreshadow Cutts leaving Google, a move that Foremski says he would not blame Cutts for making.

After 15 years as head of the webspam team at Google, Matt Cutts says he is taking a long break, to spend more time with his wife and family.

It’s the same language that senior executives often use when suddenly departing their employer. I wouldn’t blame him if he doesn’t come back because he is often the target of much vitriol and anger from the SEO (Search Engine Optimization) communities every time Google changes its algorithm every few months.

Cutts has one of the toughest jobs at Google he has to explain Google’s mysterious search algorithm and why some sites rank high or low. It’s a highly charged arena because the livelihood of hundreds of thousands of people depend on Google ranking their business as a trusted online entity.

Categories: External Articles, google Tags:

Google Adult Ad Ban Now In Effect

July 3rd, 2014 Comments off

CNBC is reporting that the Google Advertising Ban on Adult domain names is now in effect.

We reported earlier this month that Google was going to impose new restrictions on adult advertising, which some believed amounted almost to a ban on advertising.

Today CNBC is reporting that “Google is getting out of the porn advertising business”.

The changes, which went into effect late Monday, prohibit any promotion of most sexually themed sites, specifically those that feature “graphic sexual acts with intent to arouse including sex acts such as masturbation.”

A company spokesperson noted that Google has long had restrictive policies on its adult category for some time and expected many advertisers had already looked to other advertising venues. ”

I haven’t heard much about this in any industry blogs or from parking companies.

We will be watching some of our own domain names and see what the effect of this is.