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Archive for the ‘New Extensions’ Category

DotFood Starts Its Own Pre-Registration Site For .Food: FoodDomainia.com

November 26th, 2012 Comments off

According to a press release we received, Dot Food, LLC an applicant for the new gTLD .Food, launched “FoodDomainia.com, a pre- registration and awareness solution for the new .FOOD gTLD”.

“By pre-registering for a .FOOD domain name on FoodDomainia, food retailers and service providers can secure a better, more professional domain name for their business, product, or service. Registrants will be instantly identified as relevant and valuable members of the food industry, will stand out among their competitors and appear stronger to online investors; all the while increasing their Search Engine Optimization.”"Any Registrant that holds a trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), will have priority over any other Registrant to be awarded the applied-for .FOOD domain. Brand and trademark holders should pre-register early to protect their interest.”

What isn’t discussed in the press release, nor did I find on the site, is that DotFood is just one of three applicants for .Food and therefore DotFood, may not get the TLD.

One of the other applicants is Donuts, Inc, which applied for the largest number of new gTLD strings.

However pre-registrations are free and there are already almost 12,000 domain names pre-registered.

The system is accepting multiple applications for the same domain name.

Expect to see more and more potential new gTLD registries to start their own pre-registrations sites.

 …

Categories: External Articles, New Extensions Tags:

Just Because Your gTLD Application Escaped GAC Early Warning, It Doesn’t Mean The GAC Won’t Object To It

November 24th, 2012 Comments off

This week the Governmental Advisory Council (GAC) issued 242 early warnings on new gTLD applications.

There seems to be a belief held in the domainer community that if an application didn’t receive a GAC early warning, the GAC will can’t or won’t object to a string or an application.

Wrong.

This is what the latest ICANN Applicant Guidebook (dated June 4, 2012)  has to say about GAC early warnings:

“”1.1.2.4 GAC Early Warning

Concurrent with the 60-day comment period, ICANN’s Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) may issue a GAC Early Warning notice concerning an application. This provides the applicant with an indication that the application is seen as potentially sensitive or problematic by one or more governments.

The GAC Early Warning is a notice only. It is not a formal objection, nor does it directly lead to a process that can result in rejection of the application. However, a GAC Early Warning should be taken seriously as it raises the likelihood that the application could be the subject of GAC Advice on New gTLDs (see subsection 1.1.2.7) or of a formal objection (see subsection 1.1.2.6) at a later stage in the process.

A GAC Early Warning typically results from a notice to the GAC by one or more governments that an application might be problematic, e.g., potentially violate national law or raise sensitivities.

“A GAC Early Warning may be issued for any reason.1 The GAC may then send that notice to the Board – constituting the GAC Early Warning. ICANN will notify applicants of GAC Early Warnings as soon as practicable after receipt from the GAC. The GAC Early Warning notice may include a nominated point of contact for further information.

GAC consensus is not required for a GAC Early Warning to be issued. Minimally, the GAC Early Warning must be provided in writing to the ICANN Board, and be clearly labeled as a GAC Early Warning. This may take the form of an email from the GAC Chair to the ICANN Board. For GAC Early Warnings to be most effective, they should include the reason for the warning and identify the objecting countries.

Upon receipt of a GAC Early Warning, the applicant may elect to withdraw the application for a partial refund (see subsection 1.5.1), or may elect to continue with the application (this may include meeting with representatives from the relevant government(s) to try to address the concern). To qualify for the refund described in subsection 1.5.1, the applicant must provide notification to ICANN of its election to withdraw the application within 21 calendar days of the date of GAC Early Warning delivery to the applicant.

Categories: External Articles, ICANN, New Extensions Tags:

How many new gTLDs Applications Will Not Be Approved? Dirk Krischenowski of DotBerlin Says More Than 700

November 23rd, 2012 Comments off

In a story posted by Netnames.com, DotBerlin promoter Dirk Krischenowski gave his analysis on how many gTLD applications might not make it.

As we know there are over 1,900 applications still alive after several have been withdrawn for around 1,400 different strings.

Mr. Krischenowski concluded that that 521 would drop out because they are in direct contention sets and another 80 would be in indirect contention with another string (strings that are similar enough to risk causing Internet user confusion, but not identical).

He also suggests further drop out numbers:

  • 40 due to successful objections;
  • 20 geographic applications missing the required governmental support;
  • 10 due to clashes with the country code ISO 3166 list (e.g. Google’s AND or EST applications);
  • 15 failing extended evaluation;
  • 24 applicants going bankrupt during the evaluation process and,
  • 20 being blocked by GAC advice, i.e. governments saying they would request the ICANN Board not approve them.

Krischenowski’s “he has been heavily involved in the new gTLD program from day one and has spent years building an understanding of what motivates applicants and what constitutes likely new gTLD success or failure”.

“If he’s right, more than 700 applicants may end up not seeing the program through.”

“This would leave less than 1,200 actual new TLDs to be added to the Internet.”

 …

Categories: External Articles, New Extensions Tags:

ICANN Issues Details On New gTLD Prioritization Draw For December 17th

November 21st, 2012 Comments off

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICANN just released details on the Prioritization Draw (“Draw”) that will be held on 17 December 2012 in Los Angeles to assign priority numbers to all new gTLD applications including the place that the draw will take place.

Each application will be assigned a randomly-drawn priority number.

These priority numbers will be used to determine the order in which initial evaluation results are released.

Only those Applicants who purchase a ticket will be able to participate in the Draw.

Ticket have to be purchased in person, however the applicant does not need to be present at the live draw.

Unlike previous reports the $100 fee does not have to be paid in cash, credit cards and cashiers checks are accepted.

The draw will be broadcast on the web.

Here are the details

The Draw

The Prioritization Draw will be held on 17 December 2012 at the Hilton Los Angeles Airport located at 5711 West Century Blvd, Los Angeles, California, 90045.

The Draw will begin at 1:00 p.m PST, in the International Ballroom and last until approximately 7:00 p.m., or until the last ticket has been drawn and assigned a priority number.

To participate in the Draw, an Applicant, through a designated representative or proxy (see below for more details) must purchase a ticket in person for each application that the Applicant wants prioritized.

Applicants are not required to attend the 17 December 2012 Draw to receive a prioritization number for each application.

Results of the Draw will be announced on the day of the Draw and the results will be posted on ICANN’s website at http://gtldresult.icann.org/application-result/applicationstatus within 24 hours of the end of the Draw.

ICANN reserves the right to revise the date, time, and location of the Draw, as well as the date and time for posting the results of the Draw. If any changes do occur, ICANN will notify all Applicants. Any changes regarding the Draw will be posted to this webpage.

Watch Online

If you cannot attend in person, but would like to watch the event, a live stream will be available here the day of the event.

Tickets Sales

Cost: USD 100.00 per ticket, only one ticket per application is available
Location: Hilton Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Room Century C/D on the second floor
5711 West Century Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90045
Date/Time: 12 December – 16 December 2012
9:00 a.m.
Categories: External Articles, ICANN, New Extensions Tags:

Biggest Winners & Losers From GAC Early Warnings: .Gay, .Sex, .DotGreen, Uniregistry, Generic & Professional TLD’s

November 21st, 2012 Comments off

Reviewing the GAC early warnings issued last night some winners really stick out.

New gTLD applications that were generally thought would get a GAC early warning, but did not include .gay, .sex, .adult, and .porn.

Another clear winner out of the GAC early warnings was Frank Schilling’s Uniregistry that applied for 54 new gTLD’s and did not receive even one early warning.

The DotGreen came out a double winner as their application did not get a early warning, but all other applications for the new gTLD .green did receive an early warning.

There was not an  early warning issued for a potential competitor of .green, .Eco.

Other winners include gambling domains which many thought would receive an objection including .poker, .bet, although .casino got 4 early warning objections.

On the losers front there were a lot of objections to professional new gTLD’s that are planned to be made available to anyone to register including .attorney, .lawyer, .health, .accountant, .accountants, .cpa, .dentist, .doctor. and .engineering

Other losers include financials and insurance verticals including; .insurance, .carinsurance, .bank, .loan, .loans, .insure, .investments, .finance, .financial, .credit and .creditcard.

However .law and .esq did not get an objection.

Generic new gTLD applications got hit pretty hard including Amazon  which got hit with early warnings for .app. .book. .cloud, .blog, .game, .mail, map, .mobile, .movie, .news, .search, .shop, .show, .tune, .video, .song,.  Google got hit with an early warning on some of those strings as well

Other generic getting an early waring included closed applications for  .baby, .makeup, .rugby., gmbo, .hotel., hotels, .website.

While there was no early warning on .site, .inc or .llc

There were no early warnings for .web.

 

 …

Categories: External Articles, New Extensions Tags:

So What Does A GAC Early Warning Really Mean & Where Do Applicants Go From Here

November 21st, 2012 Comments off

Last night we published the list of the 242 new gTLD’s applications that got hit with a GAC early warning.

The GAC is the Governmental Advisory Group to ICANN.

So what is the effect of receiving an GAC early warning and what happens from here, we look to the new gTLD Guidebook for answers:

The GAC Early Warning is a notice only.

It is not a formal objection, nor does it directly lead to a process that can result in rejection of the application.

However, a GAC Early Warning should be taken seriously as it raises the likelihood that the application could be the subject of GAC Advice on New gTLDs or of a formal objection at a later stage in the process. Refer to section 1.1.2.4 of the Applicant Guidebook for more information on GAC Early Warning.

Instructions if you receive the Early Warning

ICANN strongly encourages you work with relevant parties as soon as possible to address the concerns voiced in the GAC Early Warning.

Asking questions about your GAC Early Warning

If you have questions or need clarification about your GAC Early Warning, please contact gacearlywarning@gac.icann.org. As highlighted above, ICANN strongly encourages you to contact gacearlywarning@gac.icann.org as soon as practicable regarding the issues identified in the Early Warning.

Continuing with your application

If you choose to continue with the application, then the “Applicant’s Response” section below should be completed. In this section, you should notify the GAC of intended actions, including the expected completion date. This completed form should then be sent to gacearlywarning@gac.icann.org. If your remediation steps involve submitting requests for changes to your application, see the change request process at http://newgtlds.icann.org/en/applicants/customer-service/change-requests.

In the absence of a response, ICANN will continue to process the application as submitted.

Withdrawing your application

If you choose to withdraw your application within the 21-day window to be eligible for a refund of 80% of the evaluation fee (USD 148,000), please follow the withdrawal process published at http://newgtlds.icann.org/en/applicants/customer-service/withdrawal-refund.

Note that an application can still be withdrawn after the 21-day time period; however, the available refund amount is reduced.

A 70%  refund is still available to all applicants until Initial Evaluations are released next year as the earliest

Categories: External Articles, ICA, New Extensions Tags:

Frank Schilling’s Uniregistry Launches .blackfriday Website

November 21st, 2012 Comments off

Frank Schillings new gTLD company, Uniregistry.com just launched a new site promoting its .blackfriday new gTLD application.

Uniregistry is the only company that filed an application to operate the new gTLD of  .blackfriday.

.blackfriday did NOT receive a GAC early warning.

According to the site here is the vision for .blackfriday:

“”Our Vision for the .blackfriday Domain


More meaning packed into a
single domain name.

While some may find it difficult to imagine owning a domain name ending in anything but .com, we are at the beginning of a revolution that will change the way people browse the Internet. Unprecedented opportunities are on the horizon with the introduction of new specialty gTLDs like .blackfriday. Web users will come to expect more intuitive naming online, while registrants will gain access to a whole new selection of meaningful name options that are much more relevant to their brand.

Uniregistry is at the forefront of this movement, investing in these possibilities to help them become a reality.

Steady, continuous growth and prosperity.

This is a unique, one-time opportunity for the art industry to establish its own space on the Internet. With proper stewardship and execution, the .blackfriday top level domain will result in better experiences for consumers, exciting new marketing possibilities for businesses, and, ultimately, a thriving online environment for the industry as a whole.

Uniregistry is dedicated to the long-term success of the .blackfriday domain, and we are one of the very few organizations in the Internet naming space today that have the right combination of experience, passion, and infrastructure required to deliver on this vision.


Why does the world need the .blackfriday TLD?

The .com space is exhausted of meaningful names. Perform a quick attempt to find a domain for a new venture, and you will immediately see how Internet naming, as it stands today, is limiting the creation of new brands. We are forced to a) restrict our brand name based on the remaining available .com names, b) seek out a name in the unpredictable secondary market, or c) settle for a mediocre domain name that threatens our visibility and credibility on the Internet.

As an increasingly tech-savvy population continues to find new ways to connect and do business online, good names will only get more and more difficult come by. New, specialized gTLDs, like .. blackfriday, are the answer. They will introduce a whole new realm of highly relevant and intuitive naming alternatives for registrants to tap into.”"

 

he Benefits of Owning a .blackfriday Domain


Right time, right place.

GAC Issues 242 Early Warnings To New gTLD’s Applicants

November 20th, 2012 Comments off

The Government Advisory Council (GAC) to ICANN issued 242 early warnings to new gTLD applicants tonight involving 145 strings.

After a quick review,  The government of Australia seems to have issued the most early warnings with Germany and India following.

The United States only issued a few early warnings, but they included Demand Media,Inc (DMD) applications for .Army, .Navy and .Airforce.

The US also issued an early warning against all 31 of Radix application but that seemed to be due to a letter of support they included from the FBI which the US government is asking Radix to remove from their applications.

Here is what the US had to say about Radix applictions:

“”Early warning for the applications by Directi which incorrectly cite an invitation from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to a conference as an endorsement/recommendation.

The notice is based on Directi’s incorporation into its applications of an email from the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The referenced email was not sent as a recommendation for or in support of a new gTLD or an applicant. ”

“We request Directi to remove from its gTLD applications the FBI email in question or any reference to said email as part of the Directi gTLD applications”.

Many of the Amazon application subject to early warnings as were other closed generic strings by other applicants like .baby by Johnson & Johnson, and L’Oreal is hoping for .beauty, .hair, .makeup, .salon and .skin.

.Health, ,Hotel and .Hotels, .Casino seemed to get the most objections and for Geo domains .dotAfrica (one who asked for the change to .Africa) sponsored by Dot connection Africa trust bid got thew most early warnings overall but there were also early warnings .roma,  .persiangulf., .patagonia, .zulu.

Not surprisingly there were early warnings issued for .sucks, .wtf, .fail, .gripe.

Religious new gTLD’s applications also drew early warnings including; islam, .halal and .bible.

If you follow theDomains.com on Twitter we predicted earlier today 227 to be the number of GAC early warnings so we came pretty close.

An applicant can receive an 80% refund if they withdraw their application within 21 days after receiving  an GAC early warning, warning also does not mean that the applications will be rejected by the GAC and applicants can modify in some cases their applications to overcome the objection of the GAC. You can read more about what an GAC early warning means to applicants here.…

Categories: External Articles, ICANN, New Extensions Tags:

Did TechCrunch Just Tip Everyone Off On How Amazon Plans To Use The New gTLD’s They Applied For?

November 20th, 2012 Comments off

An Article today in TechCrunch.com talks, about Amazon rolling out its ‘Pages” project and how that that might be how at least some of the new gTLD’s they applied for will be used by the company.

“The company is quietly pushing a service called Amazon Pages, which lets companies set up their own pages on Amazon.com as “custom destinations,” complete with www.amazon.com/brandname URLs and dynamic designs with large photos and social media links. ”

“Along with this, it is also offering Amazon Posts for companies to market themselves across Amazon and Facebook, and Amazon Analytics to measure how well all of the above is working.”"

“The bigger effort around pages, meanwhile, gives Amazon a significant leg up in its positioning brands and smaller businesses that might potentially look to Amazon as a way of running their full online operation, in place of their own standalone websites. The fact that there are URLs involved here also gives another intriguing twist to the news from many months ago about Amazon filing for dozens of generic new TLD names like “.buy”, “.group”, “.room” and “.shop”.

Although Amazon’s new gTLD applications were “closed” most understood that to mean that none of the domains under the TLD’s would be available to be registered by third parties.

However, according to this article, it seems that at least some of the TLD’s Amazon applied for will be more “controlled” than closed,  meaning they will be available to third parties to be registered but possibly restricted as to use for those wanting to do business with Amazon or sell their products.

As we have said before, you will see some very interesting new uses for domain names in the new gTLD program.

Many new gTLD domains of them will be bundled or used in conjunctions with other products in ways you haven’t seen domain sold before.…

Categories: External Articles, New Extensions Tags:

CNET: Russian Continuing To Push To Take Over Control Of Domain Naming System From ICANN

November 18th, 2012 Comments off

According to a story published in Cnet.com last night, according to ” documents leaked on Friday from an upcoming treaty conference, the Russian Federation is calling on the United Nations to take over key aspects of Internet governance, including addressing and naming.

“The Russians made their proposal on November 13 in the lead-up to December’s World Conference on International Communications in Dubai.”

“The conference will consider revisions to the International Telecommunications Regulations (ITRs), a treaty overseen by the UN’s International Telecommunications Union (ITU). The treaty has not been revised since 1988, before the emergence of the commercial Internet.”

“Russia’s proposals would, if adopted, dramatically affect Internet governance, transferring power from engineering-based organizations such as the Internet Society and ICANN to national governments, all under the authority of the UN.”

“There are 193 Member States participating in the WCIT.

“Each gets a single vote on proposed changes to the treaty. ”

“The treaty negotiations and its documents are secret, though many have been exposed through the Web site WCITLeaks, run by two researchers at George Mason University.”

“But the Russians propose adding a new section to the treaty to deal explicitly with “IP-based networks.” Bringing the Internet into the treaty in any capacity would represent a major expansion of the scope of the ITU’s authority.”

“The leaked proposal would strongly endorse national control over those parts of the Internet that reside within a country’s borders, including ISPs, traffic, and engineering.”

“One suggested change to the treaty, for example, declares that “Member States shall have the sovereign right to manage the Internet within their national territory, as well as to manage national Internet domain names.”

“Russia is also calling for a major revision to the  governance process that has long-presided over domain names and Internet addressing, which it calls a “critical transnational resource.”

“Under a proposed revision, the treaty would be amended to make clear that “Member States shall have equal rights in the international allocation of Internet addressing and identification resources.”

So instead of the multi-stake holder holder model ICANN,  “the ITU, wants to allows only its member nations to vote. Private organizations can participate in its proceedings by paying a large annual fee but cannot propose amendments or vote.”

So as the conference is next month the question must be asked what exactly will happen if the treat nations vote in favor on the ITU proposal.

What happens to the naming system” what happens if some countries set up their own naming systems?…